Sell Your Projects | My Account | Careers | This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | Call: +91 9573777164

Sidewall Adhesion and Sliding Contact Behavior of Polycrystalline Silicon Microdevices Operated in High Vacuum

1 1 1 1 1 Rating 4.90 (78 Votes)

PROJECT TITLE :

Sidewall Adhesion and Sliding Contact Behavior of Polycrystalline Silicon Microdevices Operated in High Vacuum

ABSTRACT:

The reliability and performance of contact-mode microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) depend strongly on the tribological properties of contact interfaces. Knowledge of the dominant friction and wear mechanisms at submicrometer length scales is therefore of paramount importance to the design of MEMS devices with contact interfaces. The objective of this study was to examine changes in the adhesion behavior and morphology of sliding sidewall surfaces of polycrystalline silicon MEMS devices operated in high vacuum $(sim!! 10^{-5} hbox{torr})$ and under low apparent contact pressures (0.1–18 kPa) and correlate these changes to the operation lifetime. Sidewall adhesion increased with applied contact pressure. Typically, a twofold to fourfold increase in sidewall adhesion was measured upon cessation of the device operation (typically, $sim!! 10^{6}$ sliding cycles) due to the increase of the static friction force above the restoring force available by the device. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed very small amounts of ultrafine wear debris (10–140 nm) on the sidewall surfaces of about half of the tested devices, without discernible changes in the surface topography. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that sliding did not cause the removal of the silicon oxide film (5–13 nm in average thickness) from the sidewall surfaces. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicated that sliding contact was confined at the top of a few elevated ridges on the sidewall surfaces, resulting in nanoscale wear that smoothened locally the surfaces. SEM, TEM, and AFM results of this study show that the tribological properties of contact-mode MEMS devices operating in high vacuum are controlled by only a few nanoscopic contacts, which depend on the local nanotopography of the interacting surfaces.$hfill$[2011-0325]


Did you like this research project?

To get this research project Guidelines, Training and Code... Click Here


Sidewall Adhesion and Sliding Contact Behavior of Polycrystalline Silicon Microdevices Operated in High Vacuum - 4.9 out of 5 based on 78 votes

Project EnquiryLatest Ready Available Academic Live Projects in affordable prices

Included complete project review wise documentation with project explanation videos and Much More...